Title

Care in Interaction: Aging, Personhood, and Meaningful Decline

SMC Author

Anna I. Corwin

SMC Affiliated Work

1

Status

Faculty

School

School of Liberal Arts

Department

Anthropology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-21-2020

Publication / Conference / Sponsorship

Medical Anthropology: Cross Cultural Studies in Health and Illness

Description/Abstract

Care, as it is instantiated through interaction, can both perform and shape cultural and moral understandings of what it means to be a person in the world. American Catholic nuns have been found to age more “successfully” than their peers. However, in contrast to the successful aging paradigm, an analysis of care interactions from research conducted in a Franciscan Catholic convent in the Midwestern United States reveals that the nuns practice an ideal of meaningful decline. I explore how linguistic analysis of care interactions evidence ideologies of personhood and aging, and how a model of meaningful decline (the notion that valuable personhood endures beyond productivity) is instantiated through interaction.

Scholarly

yes

Peer Reviewed

1

DOI

10.1080/01459740.2019.1705297

Disciplines

Anthropology

Original Citation

Corwin, Anna. Jan 2020. “Care in Interaction: Aging, Personhood, and Meaningful Decline.” Medical Anthropology: Cross Cultural Studies in Health and Illness. doi:10.1080/01459740.2019.1705297.

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