Title

Social Interaction and Longevity: An Eleven-Year Longitudinal Study of Older Persons in a Japanese Village

SMC Author

Mary E. McCall

SMC Affiliated Work

1

Status

Faculty

School

School of Science

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2008

Publication Title

Hallym International Journal of Aging

Description/Abstract

Many studies around the world have demonstrated the relationship between various dimensions of social interaction and outcomes related to morbidity and mortality among older adults. The current study examines these relationships between social participation and morbidity and mortality in a Japanese sample across an eleven year period. Results demonstrate that greater dependence in mobility, sensory, and activities of daily living were negatively related to survival over 11 years. The overall analysis revealed that most indicators of social interaction were positively related to survival. And, even after controlling for the effects of age, gender, disease, moving function, sensory function, and ADL function, many types of social activities were significantly related to survival. Overall, the relationship between social integration, in a wide variety of ways it can be measured, has a complex, but crucial role in increasing not just the length, but the quality of the lives of older people.

Scholarly

yes

DOI

10.2190/HA.9.2.b

Volume

9

Issue

2

First Page

89

Last Page

105

Disciplines

Psychology

Original Citation

Anme, T., Shinohara, R., Sugisawa, Y. & McCall, M. (2008). Social interaction and longevity: An eleven-year longitudinal study of older persons in a Japanese village.. Hallym International Journal of Aging, 9 (2), 89-105.

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